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    french Women protesting on International women day. image courtesy Rfi

Strike in France on international women day

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 Yesterday was International Women’s day, a holiday that, according to the Telegraph, “celebrates women’s achievements – from the political to the social – while calling for gender equality.” Reaching gender equality was the main goal of women in France.

 At 3:40 p.m., some walked out of their jobs because a strike was called by union and women’s right groups in France. The reason why they chose 3:40 pm was because, according to RFI, a french radio station,  “that’s the time [in] an average eight-hour work day that they effectively stop being paid compared to their male colleagues.” The gender pay gap has been a topic of discussion around the world; in France however, according to a french study conducted by Malthide Pak, women make about 80% of part time male job workers.

  One reason why most women work part-time is because they are more likely to have domestic tasks, so they cannot work full time; it would not allow them to take care of the house and sometimes children. This may be also why the average wage gap is so high, since those jobs tend to pay less than full time jobs.

  Women in France are paid about 20% less than men according to the study. These protests/strikes occurred not just in France, however, but around the world, with women asking for equal rights, work opportunities, and more.

I’m a staff writer for The Squall and this is my first year in journalism class. I’m a senior here at Atlantic. Writing has always been a passion of mine, so when I came across a class that would allow me to do a lot of it, I automatically took it. Every time I am around the people who are as passionate for this project as I am, it only makes me enjoy my time more. When I graduate, I plan on becoming an English major or an architecture major, depending on how I’m feeling the day I’m choosing.

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